oh :((((

shedoesnotcomprehend:

Once upon a time there was a city called Omelas, where everyone lived good and happy and fulfilling lives.

And in time it came to pass that a young man by the name of Outis came of age in that city; and, as with all who lived in that city, he was taken to a secret place where a wise elder showed him a small cold dirty room. And in that room there was a small cold dirty child, naked and hurt and starving, who had never known the least human kindness.

And the wise elder said to Outis, “In our city, everything is good and no one suffers. But it all depends on this child. If the least kindness is shown to him, our city will become like all other cities. There must always be such a child in Omelas.” …


…And Outis said to the elder, “If our city becomes like all other cities, many children will suffer.” And so he became a citizen of Omelas. And Outis led a good and happy and fulfilling life; and the child continued to suffer.


…And Outis said to the elder, “I will have no part in this evil thing.” And he walked away from Omelas. And Outis led a cold and short and brutish life; and the child continued to suffer.


…And Outis said to the elder, “I will have no part in this evil thing.” And he took the child and bathed him and cared for his wounds. And the city of Omelas became like all other cities; and many children suffered there.


…And Outis said to the elder, “I will have no part in this evil thing.” And he took the child and bathed him and cared for his wounds. And the city of Omelas carried on as it always had; and from that day forth no child suffered there.


…And Outis said to the elder, “I will have no part in this evil thing.” And he took the child and bathed him and cared for his wounds. And the city of Omelas became like all other cities; and many children suffered there.

But Outis, who would leave no child to suffer, worked tirelessly to save each one of them, and to build with his own hands a city in which everyone lived a good and happy and fulfilling life; and so in time it came to pass that the latter days of Omelas were greater than the former. And for ten trillion years Omelas carried on, and no child ever suffered there again.


…And Outis said to the elder, “Nevertheless, this child is my son, and I will not leave him to suffer.” And he took the child and bathed him and cared for his wounds. And the city of Omelas became like all other cities; and many children suffered there. But Outis did not care, because he valued the well-being of his son over all of them.


…And Outis asked the elder, “Why?” And the elder showed him to a library filled with books. And Outis studied the books for many years. And when he was an old man with a gray beard, Outis went out of the library and returned to the child and took the child out of the room, and in the child’s place he put a stone. And the stone was naked and dirty and cold; and the child Outis took and bathed and cared for. And Omelas carried on as it always had; and from that day forth no child suffered there.


Once upon a time there was a city called Omelas, where everyone lived good and happy and fulfilling lives; except for one child, who suffered so that the city might prosper. And all who lived there knew of this…


…And each citizen of Omelas, having looked into himself and seen that he would stand by while a child suffered in abject misery, found in himself a new willingness to do dark and evil deeds. And in time, all those who lived in Omelas suffered.


…And each citizen of Omelas lived with the gnawing guilt of his complicity, and the abiding terror that his own child would be chosen as the next to suffer. And in time it seemed to them that they could take no joy in any of the glories of Omelas.


…And one night, the child rose up and went out of his room and killed all the people of Omelas in their sleep.


Once upon a time there was a city called Omelas, where everyone lived good and happy and fulfilling lives. And each morning, each citizen of Omelas was taken to a small cold dirty room, and shown a small cold dirty child, and told that the child must suffer so that his day might be filled with all good things.

And all in Omelas agreed that it was better that one child should suffer than many; and none of them ever asked if it was the same child they saw each morning. And after all, one small cold dirty child looks much like another.


Once upon a time there was a city called Omelas, where everyone lived good and happy and fulfilling lives; except for ten thousand children, who suffered so that the city might prosper. And all who lived there knew of this…


…but none of them were ever taken to see the children in person, so none of them ever did anything about it.


…and whenever anyone saw such a child and “shouldn’t we rescue that suffering child?”, the other citizens of Omelas laughed and replied to them, “Naïve fool! Don’t you know that a child must always suffer in Omelas, so that the city may prosper? Otherwise it would become like all other cities, and many children would suffer.”

And everyone nodded wisely and went along with their days; and so ten thousand children continued to suffer where it might have been only one.


Once upon a time there was a city called Omelas, where everyone lived good and happy and fulfilling lives.

And
in time it came to pass that a young man by the name of Outis came of
age in that city; and, as with all who lived in that city, he was taken
to a secret place where a wise elder showed him a small cold dirty room.
And in that room there was a small cold dirty child, naked and hurt and
starving, who had never known the least human kindness.

And the
wise elder said to Outis, “In our city, everything is good and no one
suffers. But it all depends on this child. If the least kindness is
shown to him…”


“…the city will continue on as it always has, only your internet will be slightly slower.”

And Outis went back up into the city, and on that day he became a citizen of Omelas; and the child continued to suffer.


“…the best predictions of our scientists suggest that there will be a slight average decrease in various hard-to-measure kinds of happiness, which nevertheless in total adds up to more suffering than this child experiences.”

And Outis said to the elder, “I will have no part in this evil thing.” And he took the child and bathed him and cared for his wounds. And the average happiness increased in some ways and decreased in others, and the net effect might have been negative, but the best results on the matter had p > 0.05, so the scientists of Omelas could not rule out the null hypothesis.


Once upon a time there was a city called Omelas, where everyone lived good and happy and fulfilling lives.

And in Omelas there was a naked dirty child in a small dirty room; because the child was agoraphobic and was making mudpies.


Once upon a time there was a city called Omelas, where everyone lived good and happy and fulfilling lives.

Very few people told stories about Omelas, but it was a very nice place to live in.

nprbooks:

Image: Courtesy of The
Family of Judith Jones/Knopf

Judith Jones may not have been a household name, but without her, some of the world’s most famous books may never have been published.

In 1950, Jones was working as an editorial assistant at Doubleday Publishing when she stumbled upon a book in the discard pile that she couldn’t put down. She was struck by the face on the cover: Anne Frank.

“I read all afternoon with the tears coming down my face,” Jones told NPR in 1998. “When my boss got back, it was evening by then. He said, ‘What are you doing still here?’ And I said, ‘We have to have this book!’ And he said, ‘What? That book by that kid?’”

The book by that kid became The Diary of Anne Frank. It had already been released in German and Dutch, but Jones convinced her bosses to publish it in the United States, vastly expanding its readership. It went on to sell more than 30 million copies
worldwide in more than 60 languages.

Jones died Wednesday at her home in Vermont. She was 93.

Legendary
Editor Judith Jones Dies At 93

hellzyeahthewebwieldingavenger:

mrsspidermanmaryjanewatsonparker:

astierfan:

Stan Lee’s meeting with his wife Joan as retold in ‘Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir’

Bonus :

This gets better when you realize Peter Parker was both Stan’s favourite personal creation and that he saw him as a stand in for himself.

Reposting in memory of Joan Lee

RIP

tumblr_oqmlrjaAax1qbqzw9o1_1280

ponetium:

rainfelt:

aristoteliancomplacency:

katjohnadams:

winterberryelles:

lategreathenry:

X-Men: Years of Future Past

“Human hate can adapt to anything.”

unfortunately, there is so much truth to this.

The next time someone tells you to “Take a joke” or that “it’s just a joke” or that “Comedy is supposed to be offensive”, show them this. If they can’t distinguish between punching up and punching down, they’re not tolerable.

“If someone hates you, they will come up with a reason after the fact.”

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
THIS.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Piotr Rasputin speaks at length to Christina and Cameron Pryde, his children with Kitty Pryde in X-Men: Years of Future Past.]

“It always begins as a joke. Listen to me, both of you.

“One sees a father or mother of whom they do not approve – and their brats won’t shut up, and the parents are so exhausted that they just let their children scream, all sticky and crying and hitting and wild.

“And you say to your friends, ‘You should have to pass a test to breed.’ Do you understand? ‘You should have to get licensed to have kids.’

“It starts as a joke.

“Then perhaps there is a tragedy. A postpartum who should’ve gotten help, but her insurance did not cover the therapy. A father who erred, because he was raised believing men are pathetic if they are caregivers.

“The first tests are drafted. And you think, ‘Good.’ You think, ‘Those children will be safe now.’

“The test comes out, and yes, there’re some problems, but nothing that cannot be ironed out, yes?

“But now anyone with a mental illness, with a criminal record, is barred from becoming a parent, and you think, ‘Well, that is sensible, yes?’ Because you’ve never known anyone like that, so who is to tell you they are not like they are portrayed in stories?

Sick, dangerous, criminal – these words expand.

“Suddenly it is anyone with diabetes, anyone with cancer, because they could die and leave their children orphaned, so how dare they ever try to have children?

“It is deaf couples, disabled couples, interracial couples, gay couples – because don’t they know how hard they’re making it for their children?

“Then it is whoever they want.

“You think you are working for the greater good. You can’t even fathom the life of someone who isn’t exactly like you.

“Then one day – it is you. Some gene, some history, some past behavior – and suddenly, you are too sick, dangerous, criminal.

“Because the truth is this: human hate can adapt to anything.

“You think you are safe. But if someone hates you, they will come up with the reason after the fact.

“Only then do you realize what you put in power. Only then do you realize what you stripped away

“There is terrible power in a joke, in a story, in taking the truth and making it ugly.

“Do you understand, children?”

Thank you.

lauramebob:

Yondu makes a point of only taking his crew to brothels with bots; no organics. Aside from the obvious health/safety benefits, he knows what it is to be used and abused against your will and you can bet a good percentage of the organic prostitutes wouldn’t be in that line of work willingly (either sold into it or pure desperation) so, no. Bots only.