george lucas

George Lucas Visited The Mandalorian Set as Rosario Dawson Filmed Her Ahsoka Scenes

George Lucas Visited The Mandalorian Set as Rosario Dawson Filmed Her Ahsoka Scenes

greyisbetterthangray:

“It was really about the Vietnam War, and that was the period where Nixon was trying to run for a [second] term, which got me to thinking historically about how do democracies get turned into dictatorships?” Lucas said at his Skywalker Ranch earlier this month. “Because the democracies aren’t overthrown; they’re given away.”

— George Lucas

There are a lot of movies that are badly made that I love, and there are a lot of movies that are just beautifully made but I don’t like them. And critics have a tendency that that is all they focus on, which is, “I like it or I don’t like it. It’s good. It’s bad.” And it doesn’t work that way, and so you really have to not deal with that part of what happens. It’s the same thing with the audience. You know, I’ve made some movies that have – ten people have gone to see them. Nobody wanted to go see the movie. And some film that the people went and saw and didn’t like it. Probably, you know, maybe a half a dozen of us actually liked the movies, but that’s fine. If I like it, then I’m happy with it. And you have to sort of accept that no matter what.

George Lucas (x)

George Lucas on: the lightsaber

himboskywalker:

swlucasverse:

image

One of the themes of the movie is high technology and romance. The romantic human. One of the human qualities is that romantic quality, that quality of honor and justice, and everything that we equate as human in the way we focus and conduct our lives.

In this particular case, I was looking for a symbol of sort of a more humane, honorable way of being a warrior as opposed to the mechanical, heartless, machine-like approach to killing in battle and war.

One of the main influences here was the samurai ethic and King Arthur and the King Arthur ethic, where you have a very strong set of ethical rules that you live by.

The lightsaber became the symbol of that humane way of conducting your life, even in the worst possible way, which is to protect yourself by killing someone. I wanted something that was romantic, like a sword, but I wanted it to be high-tech and sci-fi to fit into this world. It was out of that that I came up with the idea of a sword that was created out of, you know, a laser that could cut through anything, but can be turned on and off like a flashlight.

— George Lucas

This made me think of a conversation I had with a larping costumer recently where we discussed the best examples of the hero’s journey in fantasy and quite a few people were surprised when we brought up Star Wars in a fantasy context.A lot of people are confused by that argument because Star Wars is Sci-fi,but it’s not really.Or well,it has a Sci-Fi setting of course,and there is Sci-Fi technology and aspects,but the story itself is a fantasy one.

The Jedi Order,the Force,the abilities of the Jedi-these are all fantasy elements.And even further,giving the Jedi Knights the imagery and motifs of classical myths and legends,such as the lightsabers,, is not just fantasy, it’s in direct dialogue with the foundation of modern fantasy, Tolkien. The Jedi Order,   while in comparison to most of the other societies and peoples in Star Wars, has very little and antiquated technology. The very idea of anti-technology and mechanization and founding your protagonists and good guys’ beliefs and aesthetics and drives in these natural elements comes from Tolkien, and is now kind of known as one of the archetypes of fantasy.

Tolkien was so vehemently against technology and mechanization because of what he saw factories doing to the environment as a kid in England,but primarily because he fought in World War I and he saw what mechanization did,not just to the environment, but to war and the innocents who fought in it. Good rooted in the natural world and spirituality and the peace and tranquility that stems from harmony with the world around us,while evil being rooted in the manipulation of the world around us,and the greed and search for power through control,is written into every line of Lord of the Rings and almost everything Tolkien ever wrote.

While Star Wars isn’t in,what I would call direct dialogue with Tolkien’s works *overtly*,Lucas certainly took a lot of influence from those themes and foundational concepts that we now consider hallmarks or archetypes of the fantasy genre. The Sith and the Empire are mechanization and power and control of their environment. They use technology to destroy entire planets,to blow up civilizations, their soldiers use guns, and flame throwers and other Sci-Fi staples. The Jedi,our heroes,our paragons of light and virtue, use swords made from crystals,which themselves come from the natural world and are imbued with the force and in harmony and balance with the natural world. While the Jedi’s lightsabers do incorporate technology, that tech works with the crystals and their force power in equilibrium,and incorporation of the two.When the Jedi use tech in general it’s always in conversation and collaboration with the force and the voice of the greater universe,much like…a certain race of little people we know who do build homes and towns,but incorporated and in dialogue with the natural world around them?

Even more, the Jedi are peacekeepers,warriors and knights certainly,willing and sometimes required to kill to protect innocents.This is another hallmark of Tolkien’s coining of fantasy staples.Luke Skywalker’s character has a lot of similarities to Eowyn from Lord of the Rings.They both begin their hero’s journey young and wanting to leave their home and have many adventures.When they are confronted with evil and outside forces who threaten to destroy their people (family,friends,ect.)they know they must fight,and because they are young and naive and have not seen the realities of war,they romanticize it,they think fighting is the noble and heroic path,and they do fight,and have their moment of bravery that is lauded and goes down in tales.But they also both come to the realization that war and violence shouldn’t be romanticized and it isn’t like the stories they’ve heard all their lives.Both characters choose peace and reach their true height and potential in their character arcs because of it.Warriors choosing nonviolence and peace and laying aside their sword is another archetype of fantasy,because fantasy is an epic tale of good versus evil.

And this is just a handful of similarities between the original Star Wars trilogy and Lord of the Rings. What’s crazy is if you break down the prequels and Anakin’s journey,his path falls in direct comparison to Tolkien’s Silmarillion,which follows the archetypes of classical mythology in almost every culture, but especially the Germanic and Greek traditions. Anakin can be compared to Achilles or Ajax or Melkor or Mairon or Feanor,because all of these characters are rooted in the same ancient stories and myths and legends which the entire fantasy genre is built on.Science Fiction by definition is about a futuristic world with imagined technology and fantastical things like space travel,but this is not what Star Wars is about.It’s about the hero journey’s, of its characters,and the epic clash of good versus evil,light versus dark,and that by definition,taking inspiration from Arthurian and Nordic and Greek legends and myths,is what Star Wars is.It is a fantasy story of knights and heroes who fight with swords of light in a Science Fiction setting in a galaxy far far away.

swlucasverse:

It’s pivotal that Luke doesn’t have patience. He doesn’t want to finish his training. He’s being succumbed by his emotional feelings for his friends rather than the pratical feelings of “I’ve got to get this job done before I can actually save them. I can’t save them, really.” But he sort of takes the easy route, the arrogant route, the emotional but least practical route, which is to say, “I’m just going to go off and do this without thinking too much.” And the result is that he fails and doesn’t do well for Han Solo or himself.

It’s the motif that needs to be in the picture, but it’s one of those things that just in terms of storytelling was very risky because basically he screws up, and everything turns bad. And it’s because of that decision that Luke made on [Dagobah] to say “I know I’m not ready, but I’m going to go anyway.”

— George Lucas

George Lucas on: the lightsaber

swlucasverse:

image

One of the themes of the movie is high technology and romance. The romantic human. One of the human qualities is that romantic quality, that quality of honor and justice, and everything that we equate as human in the way we focus and conduct our lives.

In this particular case, I was looking for a symbol of sort of a more humane, honorable way of being a warrior as opposed to the mechanical, heartless, machine-like approach to killing in battle and war.

One of the main influences here was the samurai ethic and King Arthur and the King Arthur ethic, where you have a very strong set of ethical rules that you live by.

The lightsaber became the symbol of that humane way of conducting your life, even in the worst possible way, which is to protect yourself by killing someone. I wanted something that was romantic, like a sword, but I wanted it to be high-tech and sci-fi to fit into this world. It was out of that that I came up with the idea of a sword that was created out of, you know, a laser that could cut through anything, but can be turned on and off like a flashlight.

— George Lucas

Happy birthday George Lucas

Many happy returns to the perpetually startled-looking Star Wars creator.

May the For…teenth be with you. And also the Force.